"Relationship breakdowns and Children’s Court intervention can be amongst the most difficult time for any family. It is important to remember that one size does not fit all and that most families will need a unique approach tailored to their individual circumstances and desired outcomes."

Alastair Noakes

Senior Lawyer | Family & Relationship Law
Alastair has practiced solely in family and children’s law since 2017, after completing the Juris Doctor degree at Monash University. He has also completed undergraduate and post graduate studies in psychology prior to undertaking legal training.

While undertaking his legal studies, Alastair gained invaluable experience in family and children’s law through employment with the Victorian Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (formerly DHHS) within the Child Protection program. Through this, he has an extensive history of working with children and families at risk of harm, as well as victims of family and sexual violence. Alastair is experienced in working with clients of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, including Aboriginal families and those newly arrived to Australia.

Alastair regularly appears as a solicitor advocate in the metropolitan and rural Children’s Courts throughout Victoria, and has a passion for promoting the rights of a child in family law proceedings. He is aware that the voices of children are often lost in court proceedings, and strives to bring these to the forefront, where possible.

In addition to property and parenting advice, Alastair is able to assist:
- Parents who have been contacted by DFFH regarding initial investigations or Protection Applications;
- Grandparents and non-parents involved in Children’s Court proceedings;
- With Children’s Court appeals to the Supreme or County Courts, as well as Case Plan appeals to VCAT; and
- Variations, extensions, and revocations of Children’s Court Orders

In 2020, Alastair oversaw the successful judicial review of AA v Secretary to the DHHS & Ors [2020] VSC 400 during which unlawful actions by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services regarding the removal of children were challenged. The matter has become an important precedent as to the limits on the scope of Child Protection’s powers, including the Department’s capacity to review its own decisions.